Annie Sloan’s New Video- Up Close & Personal

Annie Sloan is the artist behind the famous and trademarked Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint! She is a REAL person! See her, hear her- know that she creates GREEN – environmentally safe Chalk Paint™ with rich, luxurious colors that are durable to paint the outside of your home with!

Please view her video and leave a note saying The Purple Painted Lady in NY sent you. Then leave me a message on my Facebook page saying you did it- and on August 7th one of you will be selected to receive a container of gorgeous gilding wax!

Brilliant…just absolutely brilliant Annie is!

Now please go watch her video and be inspired!

Denice Clark Won the Whimsical Wednseday GIVE A WAY!

Happy Wednesday!

Thank you to my friend Garden Whimsies by Mary. Mary has a passion for repurposing thrift store “treasures” into unique, one of a kind garden art. They are the added “bling” every garden deserves. No matter what your garden style is …from formal, eclectic to cottage, a garden whimsy is the perfect garden accessory.

Her designs include: Garden totems, centerpieces, garden stakes, plate flowers, wind chimes and home accessories.

Mary’s whimsies were recently featured in the Outdoor Living 2012 issue of Valley Homes & Style Magazine. Mary shares tips for creating your own whimsies via her Facebook page, website and blog.

Mary and I partnered on introducing some of our Facebook friends to one another! Colleen Lang from my page was the lucky lady who was chosen to receive this beautiful whimsical pedestal stand!

It would be perfect for holding cupcakes, jewelry, candles or pretty soaps in the powder room. All you need to do are three simple things: 1) show her some LOVE by visiting her page and LIKING it. 2) Leave a note on her page saying “The Purple Painted Lady sent me”. 3) Then, leave a note on my Facebook as a comment to this posting stating “You LOVE Garden Whimsies by Mary”.

And The Purple Painted Lady in turn gave a way a free custom house plaque! Denise Clark from Garden Whimsies by Mary‘s page won it!!!

Congratulations to you both!

NEW WORKSHOP – “Get Your French On!” Ooh La La!

Due to opening our Second Location in Greece NY in August, Workshops are very light for the summer—HOWEVER…..stay tuned for our fall line up. Because… they are going to knock your socks off! For instance:

September 13, 2012 (Thursday)- GET YOUR FRENCH ON! French Typography Painting Class

Starting at 11am
COST $80

“GET YOUR FRENCH ON” Workshop ~ French Typography Painting Class

This class is focused on using Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan.

You bring in a painted piece of furniture (painted with Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan) Piece should have a fairly flat surface where detailing will be done. (piece must be approved prior by The Purple Painted Lady) The Purple Painted Lady will supply the tools and materials to create something like the images below (but perhaps on a smaller scale in regards to scope.) The Purple Painted Lady will share her tips & tricks, like how she accommodates for curves on the perimeter of the drawers, which brushes are best, how to optimize the placement and size of decorative image.

Workshop cost is $80 and it covers studio time, materials and instruction.

A large selection of French Designs and Typography provided to choose from- similar in size so maintain balance of project scope among all in the class.. For a small fee- image can be customized. Detailing will be completed in one color and a sample pot of the Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan you selected will be provided as a gift for you to take home.

Again, this class is focused on using Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan.

CLASS SIZE: This class capacity would be for a maximum of 4 people and a minimum of 2- exceptions may be made based on my schedule- however, this would not set a precedent.

DURATION: 4 hours (could go a little longer dependent on your ability) Additional studio time can be purchased for work not completed in the duration of the class- based on the approval & schedule of The Purple Painted Lady.

COST: Pricing for the 4 hour workshop is $80.00 per person- paid in full at time of reservation. Pricing includes all materials- including a sample pot of Chalk Paint™ to take home and instruction to transform your piece.

If interested in inquiring – please email me at takuntzATrochester.rr.com (please use the @ sign where I have AT in that email address) and NOTE “GET YOUR FRENCH ON” in the subject.

The Purple Painted Lady Wants To Be Your One Source For Decorative Paint Products!

The Purple Painted Lady wants to be your one source for Decorative Paint Products!

I am very excited to announce a new product that is taking the country by storm when it comes to cutting edge decorative design transforming furniture and cabinetry. Please allow me to introduce you to Wood Icing™.

You must own a retail space or are a wood cabinetry shop to attend! So, if you are looking to broaden your suite of Decorative Paint Products- then this is a workshop not to miss!

Learn 12 techniques over two days!


See invite for details and examples!

Contact The Purple Painted Lady if interested in the October 8 & 9 workshop being held in the beautiful Finger Lakes Region of Upstate NY during our spectacular fall foliage & wine season.

Need help coordinating lodging? No problem! My girlfriend owns a local B&B and I can manage lodging & evening entertainment.
There is limited seating ~ so don’t wait to register.
Hope to hear from you- email or phone with questions or to make reservations.


Thanks so much!
Tricia Migliore Kuntz
The Purple Painted Lady

I Am Grateful For You!

Hi everyone out there in internetland!

Funny how we can become friends and get to know each other through my Facebook page and email. I am very grateful for those of you who have LIKED my Facebook Page and follow my daily posts about Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paints by Annie Sloan- the best in the world! Or my artists spotlights of those who will be at The Purple Painted Lady Barn Sale & Junk Jubilee on September 22nd happening in Palmyra, New York!

One of the best parts about what I do is getting to meet so many of you. I am happy that I am here to help- especially those of you who reach out needing help ASAP! The most rewarding part however, is receiving photos and comments from customers showcasing what they did with the products they purchased through The Purple Painted Lady or with the advice or suggestions I have provided to them.

Here is a great example of using Chalk Paint™ by Annie Sloan outside. Susanne did a great job making her front entrance warm and inviting! I was really flattered by the note she left with this photo post:

“TOTALLY inspired by The Purple Painted Lady!! Arles front door (still needs another coat) Provence on rocking chairs. Flower pots in a special mix of a bunch of AS paints (mostly Old Violet). Can’t thank Trish enough for her fabulous creative eye.”

You are so welcome Susanne!



Below is a photo taken by Gloria, who was a bit intimidated regarding painting furniture initially. But I think she has proven to herself – that she has talent! She has completed a buffet, some decorative whimsical chairs and working on another project- probably as I type this. If I can share this- I believe her pieces have a MacKenzie Childs flair to them!

Next week we will have a location where all of you will be able to post pieces you have done with a brief description. It will have a voting option too- so we can celebrate those who have the most LIKES with free giveaways! I hope that sounds like fun to you!!!!

Well, it is a little after midnight and I still have “work” to do. But again, a sincere sweet thank you to all of you – I live my dream every day because of you and I AM GRATEFUL FOR YOU!

When it is HOT or COLD- I recommend painting with your Chalk Paint inside! (wax too)

Do you get as excited as I do when I see that big brown UPS truck pull into my driveway? Or perhaps it is a white truck if having something delivered via FedX. Especially when waiting for your Chalk Paint order to arrive.

Keep in mind- any time you use a product- be it paint, hairspray, perfume…temperature and humidity can impact its performance. With it being so COLD right now across North America right now- I would caution you to not paint in your garage or outside.

UPS Truck deliver

This is important also when it comes to paint deliveries. As soon as you get home- if a box was left for you outside on a porch or garage…get it in to room temperatures ASAP. Don’t panic!

Give your product a good 24 hours to get acclimated to room temperatures before opening or shaking.

Patience is a virtue here and allow the product to truly get to room temperature on its own. For when it is extremely hot- something to consider is that one of the components of Annie’s wax and Miss Mustard Seed’s wax is bee’s wax. Bee’s wax has a relatively LOW melting point range of 144 to 147 °F. I have never done a study- but the back of the big brown UPS trucks are not air conditioned and I am sure they can get pretty warm! So, when it is hot- do not try to expedite the process by placing it in the freezer. Or- for when we get back to the winter months- do not try to expedite the process by heating it up somehow. Be patient and allow it to get to room temperature naturally!

(this information also applies also in the opposite extreme- meaning – hot temperatures.)

When it comes to painting in extreme hot temperatures – ….it causes the water in the paint to evaporate too quickly. This can lead to a “crackle” like finish on parts of your piece. That could be great, if you want your piece to have a crackle finish…but terrible, if that is not the end result you were looking for. You want to paint and wax your pieces in ambient temperature … that range could be between 55 – 85 degrees. Although at the lowest and highest end of that range- you still need to be cautious.

Also, as you may be aware- Chalk Paint is a bit thicker in comparison to some paints. You do not want your paint to become thicker in the quart due to it drying or water evaporating. If for some reason – this does happen. Add a small amount of water and incorporate totally to determine if more is needed. You can always add more water, but if you add too much- you are stuck. : ) So keep this in mind when painting and the phone rings. Cover your paint before getting lost in a 30 minute phone conversation.

I like to share with my female customers in my NY store, the analogy of if you left hairspray in your car over night in the winter when we can have temperatures in the teen’s here, you would not expect it to perform. Paint and wax are no exception.

Make sure that your furniture that you are going to paint is at room temperature also. A little heater placed in your garage and running only when you are out there – is not adequate at all!

When waxing a piece of furniture- please do that in an area that the temperature will allow the wax to dry and harden. Speaking of wax- if you are a customer who has paint and wax delivered, please bring in your package and give it ample time to acclimate to a reasonable temperature. Those UPS and FedX delivery people can share with you- that do not have air conditioning in the summer in the back of their trucks! Nor do they heat the back of the trucks. So, do not open your wax till it has solidified if it just came off that 100 degree or more hot box. Or- allow your wax to soften naturally if coming in from the cold! Bee’s wax has a very low melting point- so let your wax “regroup” itself before you judge it for the first time. You want your wax to be the consistency of Crisco. It it is too thin or thick – it won’t work as well!!! : )

I recently received this message via my business Facebook page from Marci Jo about Chalk Paint freezing:

HELP! my five cans if chalk paint were inadvertently left in my bag porch while moving stuff around in my dining room. They froze last evening!!!!!!!! Will they be ok? I’m sure not….. I’m devastated….

My response to her was this:

Your paint SHOULD be ok…. The Chalk Paint should be able to go through a couple freeze cycles- but there is NO guarantee on this and you want to avoid this if all possible. I suggest that you bring them inside- which I am sure you did already. Give them a few days to get back to room temperature on their own. (meaning do not try to heat them up to expedite the process) Then shake the can and open. Chalk Paint can with stand some temperature abuse, but not repeated and there is no guarantee on performance long term when it is not kept or used at conditions required.

Thanks all and I hope you are staying warm!!!!!

“I Applied The Wax Days Ago And It Is Still Tacky”

“I applied the wax days ago and it is still tacky”

Does this sound like you? If it does, guess what? Unless you live in a rain forest where the humidity is 100%, I would bet you dollars to donuts- that you applied too much wax!

Now what?

First- I would like to direct you to watch my video on how I apply Clear Wax. If you have never watched- you should. Think about what you may have done differently than I based on my instructions. Watch that video by clicking HERE.

So, if you have too much wax on your piece, first take a clean rag that has no residual wax on it from previous applications. Focus on one area of your piece of furniture and rub it for 30 – 40 seconds. Touch it. Has any of the tackiness disappeared? (I am hoping you said yes) Sometimes- that tackiness comes from not a thorough rub off.
Clear wax

If however, the tackiness is still there…you most likely applied too much wax. All is not lost though.

So, the next step is to try a rag with a little mineral spirits on it and wipe off some of that wax build up.

Your rag should be damp only, not dripping! I like to use “real” Mineral Spirits..meaning not the “green” Mineral Spirits that has a milky white appearance. I just don’t feel it works nearly as well as the original Mineral Spirits. Take your rag and place it on the opening of the Mineral Spirits. Flip the container a couple of times in different areas of the rag. (the image I want you to think of is how a person would put nailpolish remover onto a cotton swab or ball!) With a tiny bit of Mineral Spirits on your rag, rub the piece in the direction you applied the wax. (Meaning- do not going against the grain) This is particularly important with Dark Wax and where you applied it in strokes. The mineral spirits on the rag will remove some of the wax – but it won’t restore the piece as it was before you applied all of the Wax. You do not want to be aggressively scrubbing in any one spot- you want to have uniformed removal of the build up.

After using Mineral Spirits- give your piece time to “air dry”…meaning allow the residual mineral spirits that may still be slightly on the piece to evaporate. Once the piece has no moisture to it, you can consider sanding some of the wax off. This can take a bit of time and be messy if the wax is on really thick. If after the Mineral Spirits step- your piece feels better…skip the sanding.

Keep in mind- that if you do not like the look of it after this “corrective measures- with chalk paint, you can paint right over the wax and start again. However, if you just know that there is still quite a bit of fresh wax on the piece, Annie has recommended you give the wax ample time to cure. This could mean waiting about 4 weeks. Once you go to paint over the wax- there is no extra prep work needed. Just make sure the Wax has dried! You cannot repaint over freshly applied wax…clear or dark! That is like walking on quick sand- ..not a good thing.

But let’s help you avoid this issue! Please read the following before using wax for the first time.

Wax seems to cause the most confusion for customers… So, I hope the following is helpful for you!:

How Much Wax Do I apply? If all you take away from what I say and do is this…you will be ok! So, please take note … we are not icing a cake! We are waxing furniture. So, VERY THIN & UNIFORM coats are best.

Just like when you put moisturizer on your skin- you do not put a thick coat on, but rather a THIN coat and rub it in- so that it will be absorbed into your skin. OR when you use hair conditioner…you apply it and then do what? Rinse it off. That is because your hair will absorb what it needs. Annie’s Chalk Paint will do the same thing in regards to the wax! And you should never have so much wax on your brush that it is “caked” up the sides. If you have this- you are using too much wax and more importantly- wasting your wax.

Also- you never apply the wax and then leave it that way- YOU ALWAYS REMOVE THE RESIDUAL and wipe off the extra. Never- ever apply wax and leave it for hours or days before doing this!!!!! NEVER!

CLEAR WAX- this is how The Purple Painted Lady uses it:
1. I take a plastic spoon and a paper plate. Using the backside of the spoon- I take a good amount of wax out of the tin and put it on the paper plate. (Place the cover back on the tin of wax until you need more)
2. I use my wax brush and pull some of the wax from the glob (for lack of better words.) Only the tips of your wax brush bristles should have wax on them- there should not be wax covering up the side of the brush. A little goes a long way! Again- you are not icing a cake where you want a generous amount of thickness. We are applying the wax very thin- pressing uniformly with steady pressure- but not so much that you are bending the bristles on the wax brush. I like to use the analogy that this is similar to waxing your car…you apply the wax- BUT NOT SO MUCH that when it is time to wipe it off or buff- you need a power tool to do it! So- apply a thin layer of wax and GET IT IN THE GROOVES OF THE PAINT. Again- another analogy is a Thomas’s English Muffin. Think if the wax being butter. You want the butter to get into all the nooks & crannies. Same concept for the wax in regards to the paint.
3. APPLY WAX IN SECTIONS: I work in about 1 foot sections … I use a circular motion when applying the Clear Wax. Sometimes- depending on the piece- (except when going for that Rustic look or when you have a textured piece) I will apply the wax in the same direction as my painted brush strokes. Either way…circular or not….when I have finished waxing a whole side of the piece – I ALWAYS finish with a few clean straight wipes with my rag in the direction I painted and I am pushing the wax in and wiping off the extra. If I was doing a dresser top- I would start at the back reaching across while standing in front of the piece and as I apply the Annie Sloan wax – I work my way toward the front as so I don’t lean into a previously waxed area. You will see where you waxed prior because it does deepen the hue of the paint a slight amount but be aware of where you just waxed. I also overlap my waxing sections so I ensure that I do not leave any missed spots. 4. WIPE OFF WAX: After applying the wax to one section, I will notice when the wax is not covering as much- that is my queue I need more wax. But before reloading your wax brush….use a lint free cotton t-shirt (an old one from my husband or an old sheet) and I wipe off the residual wax with a couple wipes ..circular or in the same direction as I just waxed. (I am not buffing the wax at this stage! Merely just removing or incorporating any small wax “crumbs” that may be present.) Again- a few uniformed swipes or circular rubbing (but more if necessary) – and that is it. 5. Resume waxing the next area- I wax strategically – meaning in an organized direction so I do not miss a spot. And I overlap my last “section” just a smidge so I don’t miss any of the surface.
6. The wax will dry (meaning no longer be tacky to the touch within a short time….maybe an hour or two?) However a variable in the dry time is the temperature and humidity where you are located. Is it is humid and cooler- cure time will be longer. If it is taking a long time and your wax is still tacky and you are not in the rain forest- reread my warnings above regarding applying the wax thin!
Depending on the piece I am finishing- I may have different amounts of wax coats. For instance…..a dresser. I may have 2 – 3 coats of wax on the top, but only 1 coat of wax on the sides and front.
7. Once the piece is no longer tacky- if you want to have a shinier finish- buff your piece. If you like it as is- then you are done! It does not take much rubbing and the piece will be quite shiny- so pay attention and have good lighting so that you do not over do it.
8. Remember NO WAX when painting pieces for outside.

“Do not “touch up” areas with paint once waxed- you either need to do the whole surface or don’t do it at all. Even if you rewax- spot painting always shows in certain lighting.

9. Surfaces that will get serious use (wear and tear) like tops of dressers and tables – should receive 2 to 3 coats of wax. If you are using Dark Wax, apply your clear wax coats first and let it thoroughly dry before doing a top layer of dark Wax! Follow the procedure above – always allow wax to dry between additional coats.

Please watch my wax video! Visit my VIDEOS Page here to do so!

FREE ULTIMATE WAX BRUSH- use it with your Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan Wax (Clear Wax or Dark Wax!)

FREE WAX BRUSH to use with your Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan Wax (Clear Wax or Dark Wax!)

Hey all! Here is a special promotion in honor of my incredible husband Steve’s Birthday next week! Visit The Purple Painted Lady Facebook Page and make a post wishing him Happy Birthday. Then between today (Friday, July 13th, 2012) and midnight next Friday (July 20th, 2012) – when you order 3 quarts of paint and a tin of wax (either clear or dark)- receive an Ultimate Wax Brush (valued at $34.95) for FREE.

Make sure to NOT order the wax brush when you place your on-line order (and this promotion is also offered in the shop!!!) or you will be charged for it. I will just add the Ultimate Wax Brush in your package.

Happy Birthday Steve!
I am so very grateful to God that you are my husband and my best friend. I don’t thank you nearly enough for being the man that you are!

This says it all!

Don’t Be Afraid Of The Dark!….. Dark Wax by Annie Sloan, that is!!!! (making a Glaze with Dark Wax)

One of the easiest ways to add richness and depth to a piece of furniture is with using Dark Wax to finish it!!! Dark Wax ages a piece and gives it a depth of richness compared to nothing else! This posts is specific to Annie Sloan products, but keep in mind- whatever is your product of preference- explore using Dark Wax like I show on this Bombay dresser below.

I would like to state…that I am going to share a few ways to use dark wax. Depending on the end result you are trying to achieve- directions for you may be different. Using Dark Wax allows for many artistic end finishes- so the instructions will vary depending on what you desire. My first suggestion to customers is before applying Dark Wax to that sentimental piece you inherited from your beloved grandmother. Pick up a cheap little table and practice on that! Perfect your technique prior to beginning. OR- use the back of your piece to practice on since no one will probably see that.

Wax is for protecting furniture:

I should preface in saying that using wax as a protective top coat only makes sense when you have painted with a product that is porous and can absorb the wax. Chalk Paint® or Milk Paint are two perfect examples of porous paint. Using wax as a top coat- has been the process of finishing furniture for 100′s of years. Wax as a top coat, does not apply as much when you have used Latex paint because as you may know- Latex has a rubbery- sometimes plastic feel to the surface and the wax cannot penetrate it as well. Latex literally floats on the surface of a piece of furniture – which is why you always use a primer first to give the Latex paint something to “bite” to. Also, this is why when you bang into a piece painted with Latex- the latex typically chips or flakes off.

But back on focus regarding wax, and dark wax for that matter. I always tell my customers that using dark wax is a bit of a creative process. Honestly, there is no one way to to apply it – because in the end…aesthetically if you love the look of the piece you created…then I would say you did a perfect job.

Generically speaking, in the hierarchy of how to approach a project, or the order you do your steps in, it is as follows:
1. Apply Chalk Paint® or Milk Paint & let it dry fully.
2. Apply Clear Wax (immediately wipe off the residual…watch my VIDEO HERE if you are new to waxing please.) & allow it to dry (or not)
3. Apply Dark Wax (immediately wipe off the residual) and allow it to dry so it is not tacky.
4. Lastly…. apply French Gilding Wax if you are using it.

Here are some suggestions on how to use dark wax that will give you a better result or look:

When I use dark wax I will either:

1. Using dark wax straight without cutting it over a layer of clear wax that has dried: Apply it straight over my dried clear wax that I already applied to the piece of furniture. (I am noting this application first in my list since this is the way Annie Sloan recommends) This approach – has a layer of clear wax that was previously applied and has dried and is no longer moist to the touch. This layer of clear wax before the dark wax is for protection, and helps prevent the stain in the dark wax from directly penetrating the Chalk Paint® more than you would like.

OR

2. Using dark wax straight without cutting it – but blending it over a clear wax base that is still moist: Apply it over my clear wax while the clear wax is still fresh. Meaning, within minutes after applying the clear wax. Often people will do this when they have 2 layers of clear wax. The first application of clear has been applied and is dry. When applying the second coat of clear wax- this is when you mix the dark in. Again- I will stress- since I paint pieces of furniture to sell, layers of wax are very important regarding protection, so I am applying the dark wax immediately after my 2nd coat of clear wax has been applied. (My first layer of clear wax was applied and dried before doing this all) This process allows you to feather or blend in the dark wax strategically.

OR

3. (Making a glaze) Mixing Mineral Spirit with dark wax before applying it: This method thins the dark wax and provides an easier application and additional playing time with the dark wax. (This is my preferred way of using the dark wax) The ratio of mineral spirits to dark wax is dependent on the end look of what you are trying to achieve. There is no right or wrong here. I don’t measure when I work – I just eye it, but I am going to guess that I would add a tablespoon of mineral spirits to a 1/4 cup of dark wax. For this method, take some of your dark wax and place a small amount in to another container and then, mix some mineral spirits with it. I almost always add a little mineral spirits to my dark wax and incorporate it well before I use it. Keep in mind- if the ratio you mix is 50:50, then you start to convert the dark wax to a glaze- which is also very nice to use. I apply the glaze in the same direction as my brush strokes and I use an old paint brush or wax brush. (actually, inexpensive Chip Brushes work well for this) After brushing on the glaze, I then wipe it off using a rag or cheese cloth and wipe with the grain of my paint brush strokes. Leave some of the thicken dark wax in crevices or grooves as so to accent the architecture. If you need to get a little dark wax out of the tin and push it into some of the carved areas or groove details- go for it. There is no rule about using straight dark wax and a glaze at the same time.

So, I encourage you to play with this method so you can build up some experience and determine which ratio you prefer.
Basics Glaze sample board

When making a glaze- I use Mineral Spirits. I also use Mineral Spirits to clean Annie Sloan Soft Waxes from my wax brushes. When you use Mineral Spirits cut the Dark Wax to make a glaze, I feel it is very important to NOT use the “green” (environmentally safer) brand of Mineral Spirits. It does not work right- instead of thinning the dark wax and cutting it cleanly making a nice stain, the “green” Mineral Spirits produce something that looks like a milky pudding.

Mineral Spirits comparison

OR

4. Mixing the Clear Wax with the Dark Wax- (extends play time and lightens the hue of the dark wax:)

In a separate container, mix some of Annie’s Clear Wax with the Dark Wax. The obvious thing that happens – is that the color of the Dark Wax is lightened. Obviously- the more Clear Wax you add- the lighter the tone of the Dark Wax will be. Once upon a time – Annie offered three waxes. One was an amber color. But it just made sense to sell two instead, and then customers could mix them to any hue they wanted. A benefit of mixing Clear Wax with the Dark Wax- is that is seems to extend the playing time of the wax and it doesn’t “set” as quick.

5. Lastly, you can use the dark wax straight out of the tin and apply it to your Chalk Paint® without a layer of clear wax being applied. Keep in mind- the Clear Wax base adds to protection- but this option is fine for items that will have minimal handling, like picture frames or molding.

There was an incredible Bombay dresser at my shop that belonged to one of my customers and I had the honor of doing a custom paint job on it. It is a family piece and has sentimental value- I even found some postage stamps that were from Italy postmarked 1977 inside of it when I was cleaning it.

When it first arrived it was not in the prettiest condition. But it has come a long way. In the photo below- I still had the top and feet to finish, but so far- the body had been painted with Primer Red & Graphite Chalk Paint™ Decorative Paints by Annie Sloan. The dresser below also has been waxed with one coat of Annie Sloan Clear Wax. No Dark Wax has been applied yet.

It looks nice….but oh boy! It can be so much better …and all I needed to do was just apply Dark Wax to it!

The Dark Wax adds depth and ages a piece perfectly! I love how the Dark Wax catches in the grooves and little “imperfections” which makes it look even nicer! Here are sample boards to highlight the look Dark Wax creates…which in my book …is gorgeous!

To see more sample boards of all the colors of Chalk Paint™ with Dark Wax- visit my Pinterest page here.
Graphite Sample Board - 2 coats of Graphite, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Graphite is a soft black – which I like to compare to a dark slate color. It is made with purplish blues, browns, and is not completely black. When waxed with Annie’s Dark Wax- the color becomes even more richer and warm as shown above. This is a popular color, especially when I am detailing a piece with vintage typography. I receive a lot of emails about this color. Again, I would like to clearly state- this is NOT black. It is a rich color – like dark pencil lead. It does have depth and interest- and clearly plays wonderfully with other pieces painted in a true black.

When decorating a room- try to avoid the whole “Matchy-matchy” approach. Layer texture, patterns and hues of color….including various shades of “black.” Just because you have a “black” piece- does not mean you need everything else to be exactly black. In fact- next time you are in a showroom of furniture- look at a room set up with ALL of the same black pieces…it can become quite …plain …boring, may even be a word I use to describe it. The matchy-matchy look creates minimal interest….it does not provide as much visual depth as a room with varied pieces. Again- have you ever gone on a home tour and seen a room where each piece of furniture is exactly the same finish…The answer is no!!! But- to clarify, one last time – (I promise)- Graphite is not black. But keep reading, because I give you steps on how to create a black!

Using Dark Wax over Graphite richens it significantly and you may want to consider this as an option.
For those of you just absolutely must have black- here are some options:
1. In a separate container, place some Dark Wax. Then add either Aubusson Blue or Napoleonic Blue Chalk Paint™ to it and incorporate well. Then apply the tinted Dark Wax over the dried Graphite.

If applying the Dark Wax straight over Chalk Paint – will darken it more since the Dark Wax stains the paint when no clear wax layer has been applied. BUT remember!!!!!- it is the layers of wax that give your furniture protection. I would suggest that you still apply the clear wax first to a piece that will get a lot of wear & tear and then- tint your Dark Wax as noted above to deepen the intensity of it even more. But if you have a piece of furniture or cabinets that will be handled a lot- it is best to still have a layer of clear wax. If it won’t be handled as much- one coat of Dark Wax is fine. And remember- Dark Wax is one of the last applications to be applied since if you apply clear wax over it- it will start to remove it.

2. Another tip is that I have had customers do- is bring their quart into their “other” paint supplier. (like Home Depot or Lowes or ….) and have them add 2 oz of black universal tint to the paint.

3. You can also add a little liquitex black tint to graphite to make it a true black. I have purchased mine at a store called Hobby Lobby. An awesome store with incredible furniture knobs, by the way!!!!

4. Mix India Ink into your Graphite. For a whole quart of paint- add 3 bottles of India Ink to Graphite, then mix really well together. Just a note of caution….the more outside ingredients you start to add to a product- it will start to play with the integrity…..but this is an option to use and I like the outcome! India Ink Black

Arles Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Duck Egg Blue Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Coco Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Emperor’s Silk Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Antibes Green Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Napoleonic Blue Sample Board - 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Barcelona Orange Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

Antoinette Sample Board – 2 coats of Chalk Paint™, One Coat of Clear Wax over entire board, then 1 coat of Dark Wax applied and immediately wiped off over half. Click on photo to enlarge.

To see more sample boards of Chalk Paint™ colors with Dark Wax- visit my Pinterest page here.

If you do not want the Dark Wax to stain your paint, then a Clear Wax coat prior is needed….
 

When I applied the Dark Wax to the sample boards above and to this Bombay Dresser, (take note) that there was already a coat of Clear Wax that had dried. Having a base of Clear Wax is important- especially when applying Dark Wax and wanting just a HINT of antiquing/aged effect – OR when applying Dark Wax over a light colored Chalk Paint™, like Old White or Louis Blue. I also feel that by having a base coat of Clear Wax- it is easier to apply the Dark Wax. It spreads smoother. The initial layer of Clear Wax first will also prevent the Dark Wax from “staining” the paint color. So, let the Clear Wax dry first, and then apply the Dark Wax. This will also allow you to have better control over your toning layer or antiquing effect. The layer of Clear Wax will also add more protection to your painted piece. So again- it is beneficial to take the time to apply the Clear Wax and let dry.

Applying Dark Wax DIRECTLY over Chalk Paint™ without a layer of Clear Wax

If you intentionally want the piece to be much darker…for example- many of you wish we had a pure black….so when you have a piece painted in Graphite and want to really darken the hue- apply the Dark Wax directly- skipping that clear wax suggestion above! Sometimes if I am unsure on how I want the piece to look- I will do a test spot on the back of the piece with only Dark Wax and no clear to determine if I like the look.

When I apply your Dark Wax, I apply it and then wipe it off immediately. NEVER ever …apply it and then leave it on over night or for extended hours without wiping it off, otherwise you will have a mess on your hands!
 

When I worked at the Boston Annie Sloan Workshop back in April, 2012…one of the trainers stated that you can leave the Dark Wax on UP TO 5 minutes (but no longer!- and the heat temperature where you are should make the number of minutes LESS) Meaning if it is very warm, do not let the Dark Wax sit long because it will start to thicken. After applying the Dark Wax, using a clean lint free rag (cut up old white men’s undershirts..or buy bags of rags at Home Depot or Lowes in their paint departments) – rub it all off. Always wipe off the excess wax of your initial wax application, almost buffing and you should not have the stickiness issue. At the Boston show in March, 2012- it was stated to wait at least 24 hours for the Dark Wax to cure and harden before adding another layer of clear wax for more shine. *** I personally found whenever I added Clear Wax over the Dark, no matter how long I let the Dark Wax cure- I would always eventually start removing some of the Dark Wax. I personally feel that Dark Wax should be your last step to your project. (Unless adding some French Metallic Gilding Wax on the edges- then that would be your last step.) Here is an example of what I mean about French Gilding Wax over Dark Wax:

I know this dresser is not painted in Graphite, but it is an example of a piece I painted in Coco and then applied the Dark Wax directly to it (without a layer of Clear Wax.)

When using Dark Wax- make sure to PUSH the DARK Wax into the little cracks or dents in the furniture so to capture the Dark Wax in the unique characteristics of your piece.

TAKE NOTE!!! A helpful hint that many stockists do- is that they cut the Dark Wax with Clear Wax prior to using. Mixing the combination in a separate container- you can do a 50:50 ratio – less or more- depending on how dark you want the wax. By adding Clear Wax – it smooths out the consistency and allows for better application and control. I sometimes say- that the Dark Wax seems less “gunky”- for a lack of a better words!!!

For this Bombay dresser- I actually added about a tablespoon of Mineral Spirits to some Dark Wax in a separate container to “thin” the Dark Wax just a smidge. When mixing the Mineral Spirits with Dark Wax- incorporate it really good. By adding a small amount of Mineral Spirits- I am thinning the consistency of the Dark Wax. I did not make a glaze or a stain with it. I find that by adding a small amount of Mineral Spirits it allows me to work with the Dark Wax more and it doesn’t dry or cure as fast. Meaning get too thick – too quickly.

As always- I recommend using a wax brush- and feel that a wax brush is worth its weight in gold! I sell the Ultimate Wax Brushes – to check them out on my on-line shopping cart- CLICK HERE. When I apply Clear Wax – I work in about 1 foot sections … I use a circular motion when applying the Clear Wax. Sometimes- depending on the piece- (except when going for that Rustic look or when you have a textured piece) I will apply the wax in the same direction as my painted brush strokes. Either way……..circular or not…. when I have finished waxing a whole surface- I ALWAYS complete a few clean wipes with my rag in the direction I waxed.

But when working with Dark Wax- depending on the final look I am going for- I often apply the Dark Wax in long strokes. What determines how I apply the Dark Wax is the end result I want on the piece. In this case- I applied the Dark Wax in long strokes to accentuate the curves of the Bombay dresser. I stroked from from top to bottom or bottom to top per side that I was working on. You can see the effect that it has in these photo.:

Receiving a photo of a finished piece The Purple Painted Lady completed in my customer’s home – is like eating a decadent dessert after a fine meal. I love taking a piece that may not have been quite that popular originally with the customer……… to a piece- that while their husband is touching or moving it out of my shop, they are instructing him “to be careful!” A true testament that both the piece and their value of it- has been transformed!!!!!

It looks beautiful Stephanie! Enjoy!!!!

I always recommended taking a Chalk Paint™ Workshop at a Stockist near you to become educated on the in’s and out’s (or should I say the correct way of using Annie’s products!) You will learn all the professional tricks of the trade and take your furniture pieces to the next level! All Annie Sloan Stockist go through a formal Train The Trainer- and are educated based on exactly how Annie Sloan suggests using her products. Taking a workshop is very beneficial!!!!

MAKING A GLAZE:

For this Bombay dresser-  I thinned my Dark Wax.  I don’t technically consider what I made a glaze- but it is the same concept – so please read on for instructions:

HOW TO THIN YOUR WAX
* The amount of Mineral Spirits added will obviously determine how “THIN” your glaze will be. Often- I add 50:50 Mineral Spirits to Dark Wax. For the Bombay Dresser however, I only added about a tablespoon.

* Mix the Mineral Spirits to some Dark Wax in a separate container to “thin” the Dark Wax. IN THIS CASE AGAIN- I only added 1 tablespoon to thin it just a smidge.

* When mixing the Mineral Spirits with Dark Wax- incorporate it really good. Use the “regular” Mineral Spirits- NOT the “Green” kind which looks milky white.

By adding a small amount of Mineral Spirits- I am thinning the consistency of the Dark Wax. Again, I actually consider what I did – as thinning it – not making a glaze with it- since the consistency I had when doing this Bombay Dresser was not fluid.

I find that by adding a small amount of Mineral Spirits it allows me to work with the Dark Wax more and it does not dry or cure as fast. Meaning get too thick – too quickly.

It is important to understand that once you wax a piece of furniture, you cannot polyurethane over it! It will eventually cause a quality problem, I guarantee that! You can use a furniture oil…like Miss Mustard Seed’s Hemp Oil…and once fully cured, you can use wax over that, but not the other way around. (I don’t know why you would wax over oil, but just an FYI if you are considering it.)

As always- I recommend using a wax brush- and feel that a wax brush is worth its weight in gold! When I apply Clear Wax – I work in about 1 foot sections … I use a circular motion when applying the Clear Wax. Sometimes- depending on the piece- (except when going for that Rustic look or when you have a textured piece) I will apply the wax in the same direction as my painted brush strokes. Either way……..circular or not…. when I have finished waxing a whole surface- I ALWAYS complete a few clean wipes with my rag in the direction I waxed. But when working with Dark Wax- depending on the final look I am going for- I often apply the Dark Wax in long strokes. What determines how I apply the Dark Wax is the end result I want on the piece. In this case- I applied the Dark Wax in long strokes to accentuate the curves of the Bombay dresser. I stroked from from top to bottom or bottom to top per side that I was working on. You can see the effect that it has in these photo.: Receiving a photo of a finished piece The Purple Painted Lady completed in my customer’s home – is like eating a decadent dessert after a fine meal. I love taking a piece that may not have been quite that popular originally with the customer……… to a piece- that while their husband is touching or moving it out of my shop, they are instructing him “to be careful!” A true testament that both the piece and their value of it- has been transformed!!!!!
It looks beautiful Stephanie! Enjoy!!!!

If you have a stockist located near you- then I strongly recommended that you take a Chalk Paint™ Workshop. Annie’s stockist go through formal training that was created by Annie! No matter how many years of painting experience we each have- we are all educated on the in’s and out’s (or should I say the correct way of using Annie’s products!) Annie has high expectations for her stockist and wants you- the consumer to be able to get all of the functionality you can from her delicious paint! You will learn the professional tricks of the trade and take your furniture pieces to the next level! All Annie Sloan Stockist go through a formal Train The Trainer- and are educated based on exactly how Annie Sloan suggests using her products. Taking a workshop is very beneficial!!!!

Below is a page out of the BASICS Workshop I created at The Purple Painted Lady.

In ending- don’t be afraid of the Dark Wax! I suggest getting a couple small pieces from Goodwill or your basement…and experiment and have fun!

Lastly- if you have not done so already- please LIKE my Facebook page!!!! CLICK HERE to visit the page- then select the LIKE option in the upper right corner.